Palm Springs Art Museum
Palm Desert
Edwards Harris Center
  • Home
  • Complete Events Calendar - filter

TAKING SHAPE: MODERN WORKS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

March 28th – July 31st, 2015
Palm Springs Art Museum

These galleries present the museum's primary collection of works by international modern artists in Europe and the Americas. In the 1960s, a group of famous national collectors who had winter residences in the Palm Springs area initiated a gifting program to establish the museum’s holdings. These collectors - including Lenore and Walter Annenberg, Lionel Bauman, Joseph H. Hirshhorn, Raymond Loewy, Walter N. Marks, Seymour Oppenheimer, and Lucile and Ted Weiner - solicited friends and artists for significant donations of modern art in response to the museum’s newly focused interest in fine art.  To name just a few, donations included works by artists such as Alexander Archipenko, Milton Avery, Hans Burkhardt, Alexander Calder, Russell Cowles, Lorser Feitelson, Willem de Kooning, Pablo Picasso, and Theodore Stamos. In addition, the museum installed important works belonging to the Weiners, owners of the first major collection of European modern sculpture in the Southwest.

Agnes Pelton, Future, 1941, oil on canvas, Collection Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Gerald E. Buck in memory of Bente Buck, Best Friend and Life Companion, (c) The Buck Collection, California
Altoon, Untitled, 1959   For Web
Jean Arp, Tete de lutin dite , 1959, bronze, edition 2/5, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum,Gift of Caryl Golden and Robert Zinner from the Estate of Kathryn B. Pollak, (c) 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
Barbara Hepworth, Two Forms with White (Greek), 1969, bronze, patina, white paint, edition 4/7, Gift of Caryl Golden and Robert Zinner from the Estate of Kathryn B. Pollak (c) Bowness, Hepworth Estate
Rudolf Bauer, Blue Center, 1934, oil on canvas, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Albert A. Robin and Family, (c) Estate of Rudolf Bauer, Courtesy Weinstein Gallery
William A. Baziotes, Desert Animal, 1947, oil on canvas, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Marion and Francis Lederer in honor of Marisa Shea's appointment as a Trustee of Palm Springs Desert Museum, (c) Estate of William Baziotes
Hans Burkhardt, Signs of Our Times II, 1967, oil on canvas, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Alan Leslie
Byron Browne, Fugue, 1956, oil on canvas, Gift of Stephen B. Browne (c) Stephen B. Browne
Calder   Lezard 1968   For Web
Werner Drewes, Happy Composition 384, 1946, oil on canvas, (c) With permission from Karen E.D. Seibert of the Drewes Estate at DrewesFineArt
Lorser Feitelson, Untitled [Magical Space Forms], 1964, oil and enamel on canvas, (c) The Feitelson / Lundeberg Art Foundation
Oskar Fischinger, Rubidoux, 1961, oil on masonite, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Marion and Francis Lederer in honor of Marisa Shea?s appointment as a Trustee of Palm Springs Desert Museum, (c) Estate of William Baziotes
Frederick Hammersley, Adam and Eve #2, 1970, oil on linen on masonite, (c) Frederick Hammersley Foundation, represented by Fredrick Hammersley Foundation and L.A. Louver
Alberto Giacometti, Diego (Head on a Cubic Base) / Diego (tete sur socle cubique), 1958, cast in 1959, bronze, edition 4/6, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Caryl Golden and Robert Zinner from the Estate of Kathryn B. Pollack, (c) Fondation Alberto & Annette Giacometti. All Rights Reserved 2014/ Bridgeman Images
Juan Gris, Nature Morte a la Nappe (Still life with tablecloth), 1911, graphite on paper, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of Alan Loesberg and Marilyn Pearl Loesberg in Memory of Selma Pearl
Helen Frankenthaler, Carousel, 1979, acrylic on canvas, gift of Steve Chase (c) Helen Frankenthaler
Jack Zajac, Big Skull and Horn in Two Parts IV, 1962-1963, bronze, edition of four, gift of the Estate of Lionel R. Bauman (c) Jack Zajac
Morris Louis, Number 2 00, 1962
Robert Motherwell, The Big 4, 1986, acrylic and chalk on canvas, Gift of the Dedalus Foundation and museum purchase with funds provided by the Contemporary Art Council, Robert E. Armstrong, Donna and Cargill MacMillan, Jr., Edith and Edward F. Anixter, Leisa and David Austin, Helene Berman, Marian and Stanley Brown, Judy and Rogue Hemley, Fay and Frank Katlin, Annette and Theodore Lerner, Trudy and Alvin Levine, Muriel and Bernard Myerson, Edith and George Nadl
Odilon Redon, Madonna and Young Woman, 1885-1895, charcoal on paper, Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum, Gift of the Estate of Seymour Oppenheimer
Wolfgang Paalen, Untitled Abstract, 1946, oil on parchment paper, gift of Estate of Herbert E. Toor (c) Succession Wolfgang Paalen et Eva Sulter
Soto, Cuatro Modulaciones Four Modulations,1969
Installation view/Joseph Clayes III Exhibition Wing
Installation view/Joseph Clayes III Exhibition Wing
Installation view/Joseph Clayes III Exhibition Wing

These galleries present the museum's primary collection of works by international modern artists in Europe and the Americas. In the 1960s, a group of famous national collectors who had winter residences in the Palm Springs area initiated a gifting program to establish the museum’s holdings. These collectors - including Lenore and Walter Annenberg, Lionel Bauman, Joseph H. Hirshhorn, Raymond Loewy, Walter N. Marks, Seymour Oppenheimer, and Lucile and Ted Weiner - solicited friends and artists for significant donations of modern art in response to the museum’s newly focused interest in fine art.  To name just a few, donations included works by artists such as Alexander Archipenko, Milton Avery, Hans Burkhardt, Alexander Calder, Russell Cowles, Lorser Feitelson, Willem de Kooning, Pablo Picasso, and Theodore Stamos. In addition, the museum installed important works belonging to the Weiners, owners of the first major collection of European modern sculpture in the Southwest.

With the museum’s major expansion initiatives – its current building in 1976, the Steve Chase modern and contemporary wing in 1996, and the 75th Anniversary celebration in 2013, it again solicited gifts to enhance the collection. Generous donors contributed signature modernist works by Jean Hans Arp, Illya Bolotowsky, Werner Drewes, Jean Dubuffet, Sam Francis, Helen Frankenthaler, Alberto Giacometti, Barbara Hepworth, Morris Lewis, Jacques Lipschitz, Roberto Matta, Henry Moore, Robert Motherwell, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Gino Severini, and Hassel Smith to name just the highlights. Gwen Weiner, daughter of Lucile and Ted, continued her parent’s generous legacy of donations and long-term loans.

The installation is organized around six key concepts that represent the discursive terms of European and American Modernist aesthetics: Symbol, Unconscious, Geometry, Expression, Gesture and Color, and Figure. Although not exhaustive, these descriptors provide an overview of the defining characteristics of modernism even as they offer insight into the individual artworks on view.

This exhibition is organized by the Palm Springs Art Museum and funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.